Home       Publications     Reports
Publications Reports



The Forest Investment Program finances three inter-related projects in Ghana, implemented by the World Bank, the African Development Bank (AfDB) and the International Finance Corporation (WBG). The overall goal of these FIP-financed activities in Ghana is to reduce GHG emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, while reducing poverty and conserving biodiversity.

Download Document


Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) is a proposed global mechanism to mitigate climate change, while mobilizing financial resources for socio- economic development in forest countries. The Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF), facilitated by the World Bank, brings together 50 donor and forest country participants with the aim of supporting the forest countries in the preparation and subsequent implementation of their REDD+ Strategies.

Download Document


Ghana's landscapes provide a tremendous wealth of natural resources including oil and gas, gold, forests and fish. These natural endowments have driven sustained economic growth and poverty reduction and are expected to do so in the near future.

Download Document


Ghana’s rural economy is highly dependent on the agriculture and forestry sectors, thus making land resources, including agricultural lands, forests, natural habitats, and water bodies critical for growth. Forestry and agriculture sectors, including cocoa production, account for more than 53 percent of land use and employ about 60 percent of the population, including 53 percent of women. Cocoa has been the backbone of the economy for decades. An estimated 800,000 farmer households directly depend on cocoa production for their livelihoods.

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT


This B&R Strategic plan is intended to address the uneven economic landscape, demographic shift as well as unprecedented challenges in the environment and natural resources sector. The BR strategic plan seeks to recognize the current realities while building on the existing strength to be adapt to innovative strategies and new technologies in harnessing bamboo and rattan resources, while also fostering collaboration at all levels (regional, national and district). In implementing the plan, 1000ha (in aggregate) of bamboo plantation is estimated to be planted for environmental conservation purpose. This include restoration of degraded mangroves, watersheds, slope stabilization and biodiversity offsets.

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT


The Ghana Forest Plantation Strategy: 2016-2040 (GFPS) seeks to restore or rehabilitate the country’s deforested and degraded landscapes through forest plantation development, enrichment planting, and promotion of farm forestry (trees-on-farm). These interventions are aimed at enhancing the recovery, resilience, functionality, and sustainability of the country’s varied landscapes, reducing the timber supply deficit, boosting food security and economic opportunities for people living in rural areas while aligning Ghana with the opportunities presented by emerging carbon and ecosystem services markets. The GFPS therefore aspires to balance ecological, social, and economic priorities within the context of forest landscape restoration. This report presents progress made under the GFPS in the year 2019 – the third year of implementation. A total of 25,004.2 ha of forest plantation, including industrial timber plantations, woodlots, watershed planting, amenity planting, etc. was established by Government (19,345.2 ha) under the National Afforestation/Reforestation Programme (NAP) and the private sector (5,659.0 ha). Though the overall annual establishment target was achieved, the private sector achievement was far below expectation. Efforts must therefore be targeted at supporting the sector to perform better in the coming years.

 

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT
 


The launch of the Ghana Forest Plantation Strategy (GFPS) on 23rd November 2016 marked the opening of a new era in the forest plantation industry in Ghana. The GFPS outlines the strategic direction, actions and resources and legal and regulatory framework required to restore our degraded and deforested landscapes. It indicates the technical and financial resources required and performance indicators necessary to track progress over the 25 year period. The overarching goal of the GFPS is “to achieve sustainable supply of planted forest goods and services to deliver a range of economic, social and environmental benefits”.

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT


Ghana’s economic performance has been quite strong over the past three decades. Ghana recorded about 5.5 percent annual average growth between 2012 and 2017 and became a lower middle-income country after a rebasing of its national accounts in 2010. 1 Natural resources production has been a key contributor to this remarkable success in economic growth. However, near-term challenges are substantial, and downside risks are significant due to the country’s heavy reliance on the export of primary commodities, which are mainly from natural resource commodities. In 2015, export earnings from gold, cocoa, and oil accounted for 80 percent of exports.2 Though the economic structure is shifting to services, 35 to 45 percent of jobs are still based on the renewable natural resource sectors, including mining, agriculture, forestry, livestock, and fisheries.3 Artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) of precious minerals continues to make significant contributions to the country’s foreign exchange earnings.

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT


Ghana’s Forest Reference Level (FRL) indicates that the forests ecosystems of Ghana’s Northern Savannah Zone (NSZ), an area of 9.7 million hectares, with a population of over five million people, are facing a great threat with total forest cover declining by over 77% between 2001-2015, with a conversion of 1,058,492 million hectares (ha) of woodlands to grasslands and degraded forests. The main drivers of deforestation and forest degradation are conversion to agriculture, cutting for timber and wood fuels and mid to late dry season fires. This loss can be estimated to be the cause of Greenhouse Gas (GhG) emissions of about 3.568 mtCO2e per annum.   Loss and degradation of woodlands and forests also presents significant environmental, social and economic risk in NSZ where the three poorest Regions of Ghana are located. At the national level the impacts of environmental degradation are being increasingly recognised and costing Ghana US$ 850 million or 10% of GDP

DOWNLOAD DOCUMENT


National Forest Plantation Development Programme Annual Reports.


« Previous   |   11 to 20 of 21   |    Next »

 

 

 

 

Forestry Commission of Ghana       |   About Us  |   Site Map   |   Contact Information   |   FCIIS